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Fashion Design Schools In Boston

Fashion Design Schools In Boston : Golden Globe Fashion 2011

Fashion Design Schools In Boston

fashion design schools in boston

    fashion design

  • (Fashion Designing) Is a profession for all those people who like to take the above defined seriously.Requires drive and unrelenting passion to understand the nuances of science,art and mathematics put together to make and stylize clothes.
  • The art dedicated to the creation of wearing apparel and lifestyle
  • Fashion design is the art of the application of design and [[aesthetics]or natural beauty] to clothing and accessories. Fashion design is influenced by cultural and social attitudes, and has varied over time and place.

    schools

  • (school) a building where young people receive education; “the school was built in 1932”; “he walked to school every morning”
  • (school) an educational institution; “the school was founded in 1900”
  • (school) educate in or as if in a school; “The children are schooled at great cost to their parents in private institutions”
  • A large group of fish or sea mammals

    boston

  • A card game resembling solo whist
  • state capital and largest city of Massachusetts; a major center for banking and financial services
  • Boston (pronounced ) is the capital and largest city in Massachusetts, and is one of the oldest cities in the United States. The largest city in New England, Boston is regarded as the unofficial “Capital of New England” for its economic and cultural impact on the entire New England region.
  • A variation of the waltz or of the two-step
  • Bo‘ston or Bustan (Bo‘ston, Bostan, Бустан) is a town and seat of Ellikqala District in Karakalpakstan in Uzbekistan.

fashion design schools in boston – The Death

The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education
The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education
A passionate plea to preserve and renew public education, The Death and Life of the Great American School System is a radical change of heart from one of America’s best-known education experts.

Diane Ravitch—former assistant secretary of education and a leader in the drive to create a national curriculum—examines her career in education reform and repudiates positions that she once staunchly advocated. Drawing on over forty years of research and experience, Ravitch critiques today’s most popular ideas for restructuring schools, including privatization, standardized testing, punitive accountability, and the feckless multiplication of charter schools. She shows conclusively why the business model is not an appropriate way to improve schools. Using examples from major cities like New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Denver, and San Diego, Ravitch makes the case that public education today is in peril.

Ravitch includes clear prescriptions for improving America’s schools:
leave decisions about schools to educators, not politicians or businessmen
devise a truly national curriculum that sets out what children in every grade should be learning
expect charter schools to educate the kids who need help the most, not to compete with public schools
pay teachers a fair wage for their work, not “merit pay” based on deeply flawed and unreliable test scores
encourage family involvement in education from an early age
The Death and Life of the Great American School System is more than just an analysis of the state of play of the American education system. It is a must-read for any stakeholder in the future of American schooling.

A passionate plea to preserve and renew public education, The Death and Life of the Great American School System is a radical change of heart from one of America’s best-known education experts.

Diane Ravitch—former assistant secretary of education and a leader in the drive to create a national curriculum—examines her career in education reform and repudiates positions that she once staunchly advocated. Drawing on over forty years of research and experience, Ravitch critiques today’s most popular ideas for restructuring schools, including privatization, standardized testing, punitive accountability, and the feckless multiplication of charter schools. She shows conclusively why the business model is not an appropriate way to improve schools. Using examples from major cities like New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Denver, and San Diego, Ravitch makes the case that public education today is in peril.

Ravitch includes clear prescriptions for improving America’s schools:
leave decisions about schools to educators, not politicians or businessmen
devise a truly national curriculum that sets out what children in every grade should be learning
expect charter schools to educate the kids who need help the most, not to compete with public schools
pay teachers a fair wage for their work, not “merit pay” based on deeply flawed and unreliable test scores
encourage family involvement in education from an early age
The Death and Life of the Great American School System is more than just an analysis of the state of play of the American education system. It is a must-read for any stakeholder in the future of American schooling.

Flushing High School

Flushing High School
Flushing, Queens

Flushing High School, the oldest public secondary school institution m New York and one of the city’s architecturally distinguished educational buildings, is located in Flushing, an historically rich area of the Borough of Queens. The brick and terra-cotta building is a striking example of the Collegiate Gothic style which was introduced to public school architecture in New York by C.B.J. Snyder, the Superintendent of Buildings for the Board of Education.

Erected between 1912 and 1915 in a campus-like setting, the high school with its monumental square entrance tower recalls English medieval models. It is fitting that the city’s oldest public high school institution is housed in one of its most distinguished Collegiate Gothic style buildings. The symbolism implicit in the style, recalling the hallowed seats of learning of medieval England and the political unity of Greater New York, is appropriate for a public school that has educated generations of New Yorkers for over 100 years. Extensions which were added to the east of the original building in 1952-54 and in 1970-74; while these extensions are on the Landmark Site, they are not included in the Landmark designation.

The Development of Flushing

With the consolidation of Greater New York in 1898, the original county of Queens was divided into two parts: Nassau County and the current Borough of Queens. Flushing, along with Newtown and Jamaica, were the three colonial settlements that now comprise Queens. Flushing was first settled in 1645 by a small group of Englishmen who had first emigrated to the Netherlands before coming to this country. Curing this early period of Flushing’s history under the Dutch, it became a center for Quakerism. The religious tolerance of Flushing’s early residents was marked by a formal protest against the persecution of the Quakers in December, 1657, known as the Flushing Remonstrance; this document is one of the city’s first documents contributing to the establishment of the principle of freedom of worship.

During the seventeenth century, Flushing began to develop as one of the most important centers for horticulture in this country. The first impetus to this industry’s growth in Flushing is said to have begun with the arrival of French Huguenots who settled in the area after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. These emigrants brought with them fruit trees not native to this country. Later, William Prince was the first to establish a profitable nursery, possibly as early as 1737. Another prominent American horticulturalist associated with Flushing was Samuel Parsons who established his nursery in 1839. The Parsons nursery introduced a number of new plants to this country including the Asiatic rhododendron, the Japanese maple, the Valencia orange, and the weeping beech. The Parsons nursery was also responsible for providing many of the trees for the city’s first public parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park.

Parsons’s grandson, who was also a noted horticultural ist and nurseryman, served as Superintendent of Parks for New York City in 1885 and as Commissioner of Parks in 1905; he was also very active in the Flushing school system. The grounds of Flushing High School contain a number of uncommon trees and plants recalling this important part of the area’s history. In fact, within a block radius of the high school are buildings spanning 300 years of Flushing’s history: the John Bowne House (1661); the Quaker Meeting House (1694, 1717); the Kingsland Mansion (1775); the Flushing Town Hall (1862); the Flushing Armory (1905); and the R.K.O. Keith’s Theater (1927-28) . These buildings, as well as the Weeping Beech Tree, the oldest specimen in the country which dates from 1847, are all designated New York City Landmarks or Interior landmarks with the exception of the Armory. Together with the Flushing High School, they form an exceptional collection of New York’s historic, cultural, and architectural resources.

The Growth of Public Education in Flushing

The present public school system, fully supported and maintained by public funds, developed slowly from the initial establishment under the Dutch of elementary schools supported and jointly controlled by both the civil authorities and the Dutch Reformed Church. Under the English, there was no system of state schools, rather private academies appeared similar to those in Britain. It was not until after the American Revolution that New York State undertook the task of creating a public education system. Curing the period between the first meeting of the state legislature in 1777 and 1851, nearly 1,000 pieces of legislation concerning education were passed. Among the most important acts was the University Act of 1784 which formed the Regents of the University of the State of New York. This was a corporate body authorized by the state to charter, supervise, and control institutions of higher learning.

Other important legislation established t

Man Shaving His Head In The Mirror With A Tattoo On His Arm Wearing A Tag Heuer Watch

Man Shaving His Head In The Mirror With A Tattoo On His Arm Wearing A Tag Heuer Watch
It is arguably claimed that tattooing has existed since 12,000 years BC. The purpose of tattooing has varies from culture to culture and its place on the time line. But there are commonalties that prevail form the earliest known tattoos to those being done on college students on Telegraph Ave. in Berkeley.

Tattoos have always had an important role in ritual and tradition. In Borneo, women tattooed their symbols on their forearm indicating their particular skill. If a woman wore a symbol indicating she was a skilled weaver, her status as prime marriageable material was increased. Tattoos around the wrist and fingers were believed to ward away illness. Throughout history tattoos have signified membership in a clan or society. Even today groups like the Hells Angels tattoo their particular group symbol. TV and movies have used the idea of a tattoo indication membership in a secret society numerous times. It has been believed that the wearer of an image calls the spirit of that image. The ferocity of a tiger would belong to the tattooed person. That tradition holds true today shown by the proliferation of images of tigers, snakes, and bird of prey.

In recorded history, the earliest tattoos can be found in Egypt during the time of the construction of the great pyramids (It undoubtedly started much earlier). When the Egyptians expanded their empire, the art of tattooing spread as well. The civilizations of Crete, Greece, Persia, and Arabia picked up and expanded the art form. Around 2000 BC tattooing spread to China.

The Greeks used tattooing for communication among spies. Markings identified the spies and showed their rank. Romans marked criminals and slaves. This practice is still carried on today. The Ainu people of western Asia used tattooing to show social status. Girls coming of age were marked to announce their place in society, as were the married women. The Ainu are noted for introducing tattoos to Japan where it developed into a religious and ceremonial rite. In Borneo, women were the tattooists. It was a cultural tradition. They produced designs indicating the owners station in life and the tribe he belonged to. Kayan women had delicate arm tattoos which looked like lacy gloves. Dayak warriors who had "taken a head" had tattoos on their hands. The tattoos garnered respect and assured the owners status for life. Polynesians developed tattoos to mark tribal communities, families, and rank. They brought their art to New Zealand and developed a facial style of tattooing called Moko which is still being used today. There is evidence that the Mayan, Incas, and Aztecs used tattooing in the rituals. Even the isolated tribes in Alaska practiced tattooing, their style indicating it was learned from the Ainu.

In the west, early Britons used tattoos in ceremonies. The Danes, Norse, and Saxons tattooed family crests (a tradition still practiced today). In 787 AD, Pope Hadrian banned tattooing. It still thrived in Britain until the Norman Invasion of 1066. The Normans disdained tattooing. It disappeared from Western culture from the 12th to the 16th centuries.

While tattooing diminished in the west, it thrived in Japan. At first, tattoos were used to mark criminals. First offenses were marked with a line across the forehead. A second crime was marked by adding an arch. A third offense was marked by another line. Together these marks formed the Japanese character for "dog". It appears this was the original "Three strikes your out" law. In time, the Japanese escalated the tattoo to an aesthetic art form. The Japanese body suit originated around 1700 as a reaction to strict laws concerning conspicuous consumption. Only royalty were allowed to wear ornate clothing. As a result of this, the middle class adorned themselves with elaborate full body tattoos. A highly tattooed person wearing only a loin cloth was considered well dressed, but only in the privacy of their own home.

William Dampher is responsible for re-introducing tattooing to the west. He was a sailor and explorer who traveled the South Seas. In 1691 he brought to London a heavily tattooed Polynesian named Prince Giolo, Known as the Painted Prince. He was put on exhibition , a money making attraction, and became the rage of London. It had been 600 years since tattoos had been seen in Europe and it would be another 100 years before tattooing would make it mark in the West.

In the late 1700s, Captain Cook made several trips to the South Pacific. The people of London welcomed his stories and were anxious to see the art and artifacts he brought back. Returning form one of this trips, he brought a heavily tattooed Polynesian named Omai. He was a sensation in London. Soon, the upper- class were getting small tattoos in discreet places. For a short time tattooing became a fad.

What kept tattooing from becoming more widespread was its slow and painstaking procedure. Each puncture of the skin was done by hand the ink was applied

fashion design schools in boston

fashion design schools in boston

Why Don't Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom
Easy-to-apply, scientifically-based approaches for engaging students in the classroom
Cognitive scientist Dan Willingham focuses his acclaimed research on the biological and cognitive basis of learning. His book will help teachers improve their practice by explaining how they and their students think and learn. It reveals-the importance of story, emotion, memory, context, and routine in building knowledge and creating lasting learning experiences.
Nine, easy-to-understand principles with clear applications for the classroom
Includes surprising findings, such as that intelligence is malleable, and that you cannot develop “thinking skills” without facts
How an understanding of the brain’s workings can help teachers hone their teaching skills
“Mr. Willingham’s answers apply just as well outside the classroom. Corporate trainers, marketers and, not least, parents -anyone who cares about how we learn-should find his book valuable reading.”
—Wall Street Journal

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